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Police drug diversion program

If you’ve been arrested or questioned by a police officer about a minor drugs offence involving cannabis, you may be eligible for a Drug Diversion Assessment Program (DDAP). If you’re offered a DDAP you should get legal advice.

Am I eligible for a police drug diversion program?

If you’ve been arrested or questioned by a police officer about a minor drugs offence involving cannabis, you may be eligible to participate in a police drug diversion program such as the Drug Diversion Assessment Program (DDAP).

The police have to offer you the chance to attend a DDAP if all of the following apply:

  • you’re arrested for, or questioned about a minor drugs offence involving cannabis (eg you have 50 grams or less of cannabis or you have items that are, or have been, used for smoking cannabis—like a bong)
  • you haven't broken the law in another serious way (eg robbed someone to get the drugs) in circumstances related to the minor drugs offence
  • you don't have a previous conviction for a violent offence against another person
  • you've admitted to committing the offence in a recorded interview with the police
  • you’ve not been offered a previous diversion program.

If you agree to participate in a diversion program:

  • the police officer must explain the consequences of agreeing to attend the program
  • you must sign a form accepting the offer agreeing to attend the program (there will be a specific date, time and place)
  • the police officer must give you a written requirement to go to the DDAP, and tell you you’re breaking the law by not attending
  • the drug and anything that might have been used for smoking the drug (eg a bong) is forfeited to the State.

The police drug diversion program is only for minor possession offences related to cannabis.

You can’t participate in a police drug diversion program if you’re:

  • arrested or questioned about possession of a small amount of speed or other drugs. Police drug diversion is only available for minor cannabis related offences. If you go to court, you may be eligible for a court diversion program .
  • arrested or questioned about supplying, producing or trafficking any drugs (including cannabis).

Attending the drug diversion program

If you attend the program at the scheduled date and time you won't be charged with a criminal offence and you won't have a criminal record for a minor drugs offence. 

The program is a combined assessment, education and counselling session. The provider will help you develop a personal plan to help you stop using cannabis. A family member or friend can join you during the program.

You’ll only get one chance to attend a program. If you don't agree, or you don't attend at the scheduled date and time, you won't get a second chance (however, you may still be eligible for a court diversion program).

If you don't attend the program, you are breaking the law and you can be charged with disobeying a direction or requirement of a police officer. Get legal advice.

Do I need legal advice?

You may need legal advice if you:

  • have been arrested for, or charged with a drug offence
  • have been offered police diversion and are not sure what to do
  • meet the requirements but the police didn’t offer you the DDAP
  • agreed to diversion but didn't attend the program.

How to get legal advice

We may give legal advice about the police diversion program for minor drug offences.

These organisations may also give you legal advice.

Community legal centres give legal advice on a range of topics. Contact them to find out if they can help.

Queensland Law Society can refer you to a specialist private lawyer for advice or representation.

Who else can help?

The following services may be able to help. They don’t give legal advice.

Queensland courts gives information about the Illicit Drugs Court Diversion Program.

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